Agencies and Alignments

Written by Merle Rasmussen

Nearly every nation has at least one intelligence-gathering agency to keep tabs on its neighbours. Keeping track of all these organizations is a difficult task even for secret agents. Real-life spy agencies are, of course, an important part of the TOP SECRET game — but the game world also has a few other organizations with which player character agents should be familiar. These groups may serve as agencies for player character agents or as deadly foes to be fought across the world.

Most of these groups have been mentioned in previous TOP SECRET game modules. Depending on how the adventures turned out, the organizations may or may not still exist. However, defunct spy agencies or terrorist groups have a nasty habit of turning up again if one or more members of that group can escape and manage to re-build the network.

Information about these agencies is presented in several categories, all of which are defined below. It is assumed that this information is commonly available to player character agents, but not necessarily to the general public.

Nature of agency: The basic nature of the organization.
HQ: The main headquarters for agency operations.
Established: The year the agency was founded.
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence means that the agency is responsible for counterespionage inside the borders of its own country. Foreign counterintelligence means that the agency is responsible for counterespionage outside the borders of its own country.
Policies: The major laws and philosophies of the organization.
Objectives: The major goals of the organization.
Areas of involvement: The places in which the agency is known to operate or where its jurisdiction extends.
Allies: Agencies often share intelligence data formally and informally with one another, when it suits them to do so. Associated agencies do not necessarily share intelligence because of publicly recognized treaties.
Additional data: More information on agency structure, operations, covers, and past history is given here.
Bureaus: If the word “All” is present here, the following TOP SECRET game bureaus may be active within a particular agency: Administration, Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination (see DRAGON issue 82, “New Avenues for Agents” for an explanation of the newest bureaus).
Alignment profile: An agent trained by a particular intelligence agency will very often develop political opinions that are shared by a majority of fellow agents in the organization. The range of personal opinions an agent has relating to political systems, political change, and economic systems is called his alignment profile. Characters’ alignments can be determined by choice or by random roll using the table below. To determine a non-player character’s alignments, roll percentile dice. Any value outside the agency profile should be disregarded and the dice rerolled.

Though a player character agent may have political opinions that do not match those of his fellow agents, serious problems will occur if an agent adopts an alignment profile that is markedly different from that of his agency. Would an agent who is an avowed capitalist supporting the violent overthrow of the Soviet government get far in the KGB? Not likely.

Political alignment refers to one’s belief in whether governmental authority should be spread out to all of a country’s population (“democratic”) or kept in the hands of one person (“autocratic”), or some belief between those two extremes. The terms “democratic” and “republican” have nothing to do with the American political parties of the same names.

The “change” alignment measures one’s opinions on political change; those with “radical” beliefs think that change should be rapid and far-reaching; those who are “reactionary”, want no change at all.

Finally, economic alignment measures one’s beliefs in private enterprise (“capitalist”) or in government control of business (“communist”), or some position between those two extremes.

Generally speaking, characters with similar alignments will get along well together, since they understand each other’s political and economic views. Characters with opposite alignments will usually not get along well over prolonged periods of time. When a player character has to work for an extended period of time with an NPC agent of a different alignment, find the numerical differences between their alignments. The average of these three differences — political, change, and economic — is the percentage chance that there will be trouble between the agents, usually brought on by the NPC agent’s intolerance of the PC agent.

For example, a PC agent’s alignments are 10/33/55, and a NPC agent’s alignments are 10/44/95. The differences are 0, 11, and 40, making an average difference of 17. If the Administrator rolls 17 or less on percentile dice, these two agents will clash at some point during the mission. The nature and results of the difficulties may be administered as desired.

Operations: Missions in game modules in which the described agency was involved. This includes separately published adventures, adventures in DRAGON Magazine, and unpublished material from the soon-to-be-released TOP SECRET Game Companion set.

“The Agency”

Nature of agency: Supranational intelligence organization
HQ: Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, USA
Established: 1980
Activities: Military intelligence, strategic intelligence, electronic intercept, foreign counterintelligence
Policies: Agents are forbidden to reveal their connection with the organization unless express permission is obtained from the Administrator prior to a given mission
Objectives: To rid the world of offensive characters, to set right the wrongs, to bring honour to the organization, and to improve individual agents. These objectives supersede national priorities. (In fact, some major spies from both the Soviet Union and the United States are members of this group.)
Areas of involvement: The Earth, the Moon, and the space in between
Allies: UN Security Council
Additional data: Cover businesses for “The Agency” include International Trade and Lending, Inc., and New World Distributors.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-00/01-00/01-00
Operations: Admin. File 001 Sprechenhaltestelle; TS 002 Rapidstrike; TS 003 Lady in Distress; TS 005 Orient Express; TS 006 Ace of Clubs; and the “Whiteout” mission (DRAGON issue 87).

Anti-Imperialist Army (AIA)

Nature of agency: Terrorist group
HQ: Tripoli, Libya
Established: 1947
Activities: Hijacking and destroying trains and aircraft, ransoming passengers until ALA’s demands are met, embassy bombing, and performing many other terrorist activities.
Policies: The AIA considers all “colonial” (i.e., European and American) nations to be its enemies.
Objectives: To free political prisoners, fight for the rights of the oppressed, “correct” corrupt governments and bring their crimes to world attention.
Areas of involvement: Europe and Libya
Allies: None
Additional data: Personnel are known for spectacular terrorist attacks, which are characterised by extreme violence, brutality, and a certain flair for gaining wide media attention.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 82-00/01-06/07-94
Operations: TS 005 Orient Express

Blackbird

Nature of agency: Spy ring operating throughout Western Europe. Blackbird operatives work for no known side.
HQ: Headquarters are apparently mobile and constantly on the move.
Established: 1973
Activities: Steals information from various governments and sells the information to the highest bidder.
Policies: Money talks; use computers to best possible benefit.
Objectives: No political goals; operates out of self-interest only. Avoids all media attention.
Areas of involvement: Western Europe and European rail networks
Allies: None
Additional data: Highly involved in computers and rail transport
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/07-94/01-06
Operations: TS 005 Orient Express

The Cartel

Nature of agency: International criminal organization secretly financed by several multinational corporations
HQ: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Established: 1982
Activities: Known to have hired French mercenaries to kidnap the President of the U.S.A. from Pineton, Maine; and, regularly perform kidnappings, extortions, hijackings, skyjackings, and high-tech theft.
Policies: Prevent national governments from restricting free trade and “private business” and believe in laissez faire economics.
Objectives: To promote all policies stated above
Areas of involvement: North America and many French-speaking countries
Allies: None
Additional data: Using all resources available to them, both the American and Canadian governments are actively involved in a major manhunt for all personnel belonging to this organization.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 07-94/07-94/01-19
Operations: Mini-module Executive One (with Administrator’s Screen)

Children of Neptune (CON)

Nature of agency: Ultra-survivalist group bent on continental or world domination through colonisation, nuclear blackmail, and “hemisphericide”.
HQ: Atlantis II (Whiteout Base), Antarctic Peninsula
Established: 1971
Activities: Drug trafficking, the selling of military secrets, and the counterfeiting of Swiss francs
Policies: These people are interested in health foods, environmental protection, unlimited use and ownership of firearms, and fighting in other people’s wars as volunteers. They also oppose all forms of government interference and refuse to pay taxes of any sort. They vote conservatively.
Objectives: To build future-survival cities in Antarctica, on the ocean’s surface, and on the ocean floor; and, to construct a nuclear-powered floating drydock for the assembly of armed floating out islands.
Areas of involvement: The Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, Alulu Island in the west central Pacific Ocean, and the Antarctic Peninsula.
Allies: The Exterminators
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 95-00/82-00/82-00
Operations: “Doctor Yes” (DRAGON issue 4Cool, “Mad Merc” (DRAGON issue 56), “Whiteout” (DRAGON issue 87)

The Exterminators

Nature of agency: Mercenary assassination team once employed as guards by Doctor Yes
HQ: Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA
Established: 1981
Activities: Protection and assassination missions as desired by patrons
Policies: Money talks; they work for the highest bidder.
Objectives: No political goals except those of employer
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, particularly Pacific Basin
Allies: CON
Additional data: The three known members of this group (Dale Craig, Chuck Morris, and Bruce Nee) are reputed to be training assassins for unknown private and international agencies. All three members have $3500 rewards offered for their capture. They wear company emblems on their jackets, and use armoured vans supposedly operated by a pest-control company.
Bureaus: Assassination
Alignment profile: 01-81/07-94/01-06
Operations: “Doctor Yes” (DRAGON issue 4Cool

Headquarters of Education Against Revolution, Terrorism, and Sedition (HEARTS)

Nature of agency: An association of western espionage agencies
HQ: Ace of Clubs Luxury Resort, upstate New York, USA
Established: 1974
Activities: Training secret agents for Western intelligence groups
Policies: Maintain the Ace of Clubs (a front that appears to be an exclusive adventure sports and gambling resort for members only). All monies earned from the operation of the frontare to be turned over to HEARTS.
Objectives: To provide the most complete and rigorous training for Western agents possible. The resort also serves as agents’ R&R spot.
Areas of involvement: Ace of Clubs Luxury Resort only
Allies: Most Western intelligence agencies will support HEARTS to the fullest extent of their powers.
Additional data: The resort may become the target for future terrorist, espionage, and saboteur activity.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 07-19/07-94/07-81
Operations: TS 006 Ace of Clubs

Hydra

Nature of agency: Moderate-sized criminal organization
HQ: Located in Florida or Georgia, USA
Established: 1981
Activities: Extortion, grand theft, protection rackets, vice, and gambling
Policies: No political ethics; solely concerned with making money through criminal operations and through legitimate businesses (used as fronts).
Objectives: To expand their criminal operations throughout the Southeastern United States, taking control of extortion and protection, “businesses” in particular.
Areas of involvement: Florida, USA
Allies: Very loose ties with other criminal syndicates, but no close allies.
Additional data: Hydra employees have been carefully trained to take charge of their section of the syndicate if their superiors have been “rendered inoperable”. This requires a high degree of trust among the Hydra personnel, and they are less likely to turn in their fellow organization members to police forces than other criminals might be. A large number of wanted gunmen and assassins are employed by Hydra as bodyguards and killers.
Bureaus: Administration,
Assassination, Confiscation, Operations, Technical
Alignment profile: 82-00/07-94/01-81
Operations: “Wacko World” mission (DRAGON issue 79).

International Security Bureau (ISB)

Nature of agency: A multinational Western organization
HQ: Paris, France
Established: 1946
Activities: Handling defections of important personnel from behind Iron Curtain
Policies: Given free rein to operate without interference from other Western agencies. Its multinational nature allows ISB to conduct operations without having to implicate a specific nation.
Objectives: To place defectors in “productive position” within Western nations
Areas of involvement: Eastern Europe
Allies: NATO, government of Switzerland
Additional data: The ISB has six sections. Section Mercury is the Eastern European Operations section; Section Venus monitors the Sino-Soviet border; Section Mars handles defectors from the military of the Soviet Union; Section Jupiter takes in defectors from the diplomatic corps; Section Saturn is involved with scientists and intellectual dissidents; and, Section Pluto tracks Soviet space missions, manned and unmanned (not necessarily for defections).
Bureaus: Assassination, Confiscation, and Investigation
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81
Operations: TS 004 Fastpass

Red Dawn

Nature of agency: Terrorist splinter group
HQ: Liverpool, England
Established: 1982
Activities: Terrorist bombings and assassinations with political motivations
Policies: The group is a radical communist organization that espouses the destruction of all Western governments, but it also does not approve of most Communist governments, however. The Red Dawn promotes anarchy.
Objectives: To bring about a repressive British government by committing acts of terrorism, forcing the government to adopt more radical and authoritarian measures to deal with the situation. Hopefully, the populace of Britain would then overthrow the government and install a system based upon communist anarchy.
Areas of involvement: Primarily the United Kingdom, though some terrorists have traveled to other countries to commit their crimes.
Allies: Numerous small radical terrorist groups throughout the United Kingdom, France, West Germany, and (possibly) the United States; Eastern bloc involvement possible.
Additional data: The Red Dawn is noted for several acts of senseless violence directed at innocent bystanders as well as at political figures. It is regarded as extremely dangerous and may soon become a “most wanted” terrorist organization. Its members are fanatical to an extreme.
Bureaus: Administration, Assassination, Confiscation
Alignment profile: 01-06/01-06/95-00
Operations: “Wacko World” (DRAGON issue 79).

Terrorist Revolutionaries for United Military Power (TRUMP)

Nature of agency: International terrorist revolutionary group
HQ: Leningrad, USSR
Established: 1954
Activities: Attempted takeover of the Ace of Clubs Luxury Resort (see above). Also, to keep Western espionage from becoming more efficient, spread “disinformation” and train Eastern-bloc secret agents.
Policies: Any means, including violence, that achieve TRUMP’s goals are acceptable to its members.
Objectives: TRUMP is obsessed with putting the entire world under military rule.
Areas of involvement: Democratic countries are TRUMP’s first and foremost targets.
Allies: AIA, GRU
Additional data: Original name was Today’s Revolutionaries Under Military Persecution.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-94/95-00/20-94
Operations: TS 006 Ace of Clubs

Tiger Team Alpha

Nature of agency: Private contractor with NATO.
HQ: Rome, Italy
Established: 1965
Activities: Testing the security of supposedly safe computer systems.
Policies: Personnel work only on computer systems, not for personal gain or fame.
Objectives: Dependent on terms of contract
Areas of involvement: Industrial nations using computer technology
Allies: NATO
Additional data: This company employs people who are infatuated with computer technology, including hackers, and computer criminals as well as various electronic wizards. Unofficial motto is said to be: “Impossible things take five minutes more.”
Bureaus: Technical and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/01-81
Operations: TS 005 Orient Express

Table of Alignments

Dice Alignments
Roll Political Change Economic
01-06 Democratic Radical Capitalist
07-19 Republican Liberal Unionist
20-81 Neutral Neutral Neutral
82-94 Authoritarian Conservative Socialist
95-00 Autocratic Reactionary Communist

Authentic Agencies Part 3

Written by Merle Rasmussen

This is the last in a series of articles presenting the TOP SECRET game world’s intelligence community. DRAGON issue 93 described the game’s fictitious spy agencies; issues 97 and 98 gave information on the American and allied foreign espionage organizations, respectively. This month’s edition presents the Communist spy organizations (including the infamous KGB). It also gives a little more information on agencies described earlier, new agencies, and spy agencies in general.

Though these agencies exist in the real world, they are given here only as constructs for the TOP SECRET game world. Some of the statistics given below for these agencies are reasonably accurate and are taken from publicly available information, but some of the statistics were invented for the sake of completeness, and some have been altered to conform to the specific background and nature of the TOP SECRET game world.

Information about these agencies, as with the previous articles, is presented in several categories defined below. It is assumed that this information is commonly available to player character agents and to the general public, though the agents might be given additional information that is not public knowledge, during the course of a game campaign.

Nature of agency: The basic nature of the organization.
Governing body: The governing body of most intelligence organizations are national governments. The control for government agencies is the government official to whom the chief of the agency reports. Non-government organizations may have a short description of their group listed here.
Personnel: The estimated size of agency staffs based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
Annual budget: The US dollar figures shown are estimates based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
HQ: The main headquarters for agency operations.
Established: The date the agency was founded.
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence means that the agency is responsible for counterespionage inside the borders of its own country. Foreign counterintelligence means that the agency has responsible for counterespionage outside the borders of its own country.
Policies: Several of the major laws and philosophies of the organization.
Objectives: The major goals of the organization.
Areas of involvement: The places in which the agency is known to operate or exercise jurisdiction.
Allies: Agencies often share intelligence data formally and informally with one another, when it suits them to do so. Associated agencies do not necessarily share intelligence because of publicly recognized treaties.
Additional data: More information on agency structure, operations, covers, and past history is given here.
Bureaus: If the word “All” is present in this category, the following TOP SECRET bureaus may be active within a particular agency: Administration, Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination (see DRAGON issue 82, “New avenues for agents” for an explanation of the newest bureaus). The DIA serves as the Administration Bureau for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps Intelligence. The KGB is the Administration Bureau for the intelligence agencies of the Warsaw Pact nations.
Alignment profile: An agent trained by a particular intelligence agency will very often develop political opinions that are shared by a majority of fellow agents in the organization. The range of personal opinions an agent has relating to political systems, political change, and economic systems are called his alignment profile. The TOP SECRET alignment system was detailed in DRAGON issue 93, in “Agencies and Alignments”.

For further details about the KGB, GRU, and the Hungarian AVB, see p. 32 of module TS 004, Operation: Fastpass.

Warsaw Pact

Nature of agency: International Communist mutual defensive alliance
Governing body: Member nations (under Soviet control)
Personnel: Varies
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: None
Established: 1955
Activities: Military and naval defensive alliance
Policies: An attack upon one member is regarded as an attack on all members.
Objectives: The Warsaw Pact is the Communist equivalent of NATO. It seeks to defend the Eastern-bloc portion of Europe and Asia from attack.
Areas of involvement: All member countries
Allies: Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, E. Germany (Democratic Republic of Germany), Hungary, Poland, Rumania, and the USSR
Additional data: Albania, a signatory member, was barred from meetings in 1962 and withdrew from the Pact in 1968, following ideological differences with other member nations.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-94/20-94

Komitet Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti (KGB, Committee for State Security)

Nature of agency: Principal Soviet intelligence service in charge of internal security and external espionage
Governing body: Politburo, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Personnel: 400,000-500,000 directly (this includes 25,000- 100,000 assigned to foreign intelligence and counterintelligence, 300,000 troops and guards, and 100,000 administrative personnel)
Annual budget: Unknown, even in USSR
HQ: 2 Dzerzhingsky Square, Moscow, USSR
Established: 1954
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: The KGB heads the system of state security organs, and it also includes border troops, military counterintelligence, and other institutions such as labor camp guards.
Objectives: The KGB combats espionage, terrorism, sabotage, and subversive propaganda of the so-called imperialist states and foreign anti-Soviet centers. It insures the security of the state boundaries of the USSR, investigates crimes aimed at subverting and weakening the Soviet State and social order, and participates in the development of statewide measures to ensure the state security of the country. The KGB conducts indoctrinational-preventative work to thwart actions aimed at undermining the state and social order of the USSR
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, particularly within the USSR and its satellites, USA, Canada, Latin America, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Scandanavia, West Germany, Austria, France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Ireland, China, Vietnam, North Korea, Japan, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, the Arab nations, Yugoslavia,.Turkey, Greece, Iran, Afghanistan, Albania, the English-speaking nations of Africa, and the French-speaking nations of Africa
Allies: GRU, DGI, and intelligence agencies of the Warsaw Pact nations.
Additional data: The KGB is recognized as the world’s largest intelligence organization. Its agents excel in human intelligence (HUMINT). KGB agents infiltrate most Soviet institutions, including the GRU.
Bureaus: All. The KGB is the Administration Bureau for the intelligence agencies of all Warsaw Pact nations.
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-94/20-00

Glavnoye Razvedyvatelnoye Upravleniye (GRU, Chief Intelligence Directorate of the Soviet General Staff)

Nature of agency: Soviet military intelligence service
Governing body: Ministry of Defense, USSR
Personnel: 25,000
Annual budget: Unknown, even in the USSR, but much less than is given to the KGB
HQ: Moscow, USSR
Established: 1920
Activities: Military intelligence, electronic intercept, industrial espionage, and guerrilla warfare
Policies: The GRU maintains its own schools, offices in Soviet embassies, operations, and communications channels. Most Soviet military attaches are GRU agents.
Objectives: To serve as an independent source of overall foreign intelligence for the General Staff
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, via a network of agents directed by Soviet military attaches abroad and from the intelligence staffs of the Soviet Army, Navy, and Air Force
Allies: KGB
Additional data: The GRU is considered by some to be a subsidiary of the KGB. An intense rivalry exists between agents of the KGB and the GRU.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-00/20-94

Central Control of Information

Nature of agency: Communist China’s secret service
Governing body: Social Affairs Department the of Central Committee of the Communist Party, People’s Republic of China
Personnel: 10,000,000 (estimated)
Annual budget: $12.3 billion
HQ: 15 Bow Street Alley, Beijing (Peking), PRC
Established: Unknown, possibly millennia old; probably the most ancient of all intelligence agencies
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; and, domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: The Central Control of Information concentrates more upon maintaining internal security than upon spying against foreign targets.
Objectives: To obtain free military and technical intelligence from industrialized nations of the world through overt, not covert, means
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, through journalists, business people, military delegations, and students (especially in the USA, Europe, and Japan)
Allies: An information alliance exists with the USA, through weak oral and written recognition of mutual strategic interests (i.e., watching the Soviets).
Additional data: The Communist Chinese intelligence service is ancient and massive. It is organized as one of 13 secret departments among 30 operated by the Central Committee. There are four major units: those of the Chinese Communist Party, the foreign office (Central External Liaison Department), the defense ministry (Military Intelligence Department of the General Staff), and the State Council (government). Each unit not only performs intelligence functions but checks on the others as well. In 1980, the United States and China set up a jointly operated listening post in the mountainous Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of western China. This post monitors Soviet nuclear missile test flights along the Sino-Soviet border. The Social Affairs Department is similar to the Soviet KGB in its attempts to exercise overall control of intelligence received by the politburo. The size of the CCI reflects the large number of “official” agents throughout China who turn in intelligence data to the agency regularly.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-94/01-94/20-00

State Secret Security (STB)

Nature of agency: Czechoslovakian security service and secret police
Governing body: Minister of the Interior, Czechoslovakia
Personnel: 52,000
Annual budget: $950 million
HQ: Prague, Czechoslovakia
Established: 1948
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; and, domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To guard the borders, watch for foreign subversion, prevent civil disorder, and cooperate with the KGB
Objectives: To teach sabotage, weapons use, electronic telecommunications, and urban guerrilla tactics to terrorists
Areas of involvement: Czechoslovakia
Allies: KGB
Additional data: The KGB set up a terrorist training camp for novice terrorists in Karolovy Vary. Top foreign terrorists from Europe and the Third World are trained at a GRU parachute camp in the middle of a 2,000 acre forest, only 30 miles south of Karolovy Vary. The latter camp is called Doupov.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-94/20-94

Staatssicherheitsdienst (SSD, Ministry for Security and Intelligence)

Nature of agency: East German security and intelligence service, and secret police
Governing body: Politburo, Democratic Republic of Germany (DDR, East Germany)
Personnel: 57,000
Annual budget: $1 billion
HQ: East Berlin, DDR
Established: 1953
Activities: Military, economic, political, and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; and, domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To guard the borders, watch for foreign subversion, prevent civil disorder, and cooperate with the KGB
Objectives: To provide terrorists with instant sanctuary, false documents, money, paramilitary training, protected entrance and exit routes in and out of the country, and weapons
Areas of involvement: West Germany and Third World nations in Africa and Latin America
Allies: KGB
Additional data: The SSD is the most efficient of the Warsaw Pact intelligence agencies, and it is part of the Ministerium fur Staatssicherheit (MfS, Ministry for State Security), also founded in 1953. East Germany’s Verwaltung fur Koordinierung (VfK, Administration for Coordination) is in charge of East German military intelligence. Part of the VfK’s list of tasks is to secure information concerning military matters in general, military policy, and armaments. The 400 officers, NCOs, and enlisted personnel belonging to the VfK’s directing staff are influenced by Soviet advisors. The VfK works closely with the Independent Department of the Political Administration of the National People’s Army. The VfK’s alignment profile is 20-94/07-94/20-94.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 07-81/07-94/20-94

Allami Vedelmi Batosag (AVB, State Security Guard)

Nature of agency: Hungarian security service and secret police
Governing body: Hungary
Personnel: 36,000
Annual budget: $800 million
HQ: Budapest, Hungary
Established: 1948
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To guard the borders, watch for foreign subversion, prevent civil disorder, and cooperate with the KGB
Objectives: To provide terrorists with weapons and training
Areas of involvement: Hungary
Allies: KGB
Additional data: See module TS 004, Operation : Fastpass, for more information.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, Assassination
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-94/20-94

Durzhavna Sigurnost (DS)

Nature of agency: Bulgarian security service and secret police
Governing body: Interior Minister, Bulgaria
Personnel: 30,000
Annual budget: $750,000
HQ: On General Gurko Street, Sofia, Bulgaria
Established: 1947
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To guard the borders, watch for foreign subversion, prevent civil disorder, and cooperate with the KGB
Objectives: To smuggle weapons, sell and ship arms, train guerrillas, and perform coups and assassinations.
Areas of involvement: Bulgaria
Allies: KGB
Additional data: The loyal Bulgarian security service is closest to the KGB of any satellite spy agency, and it’s also the most obedient. The KGB runs a training camp for foreigners (disguised as a pig farm) near Birimirtsi, 7 miles north of Sofia.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, Assassination
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-94/20-00

Direction Generale de Inteligencia (DGI)

Nature of agency: Cuban security service and secret police
Governing body: Cuba
Personnel: 34,000
Annual budget: $775 million
HQ: Camp Matanzas, just outside Havana, Cuba
Established: 1968
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence; electronic intercept; domestic and foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To guard the borders, watch for foreign subversion, prevent civil disorder, and cooperate with the KGB
Objectives: To teach urban guerrilla tactics, automatic arms, plastic explosives, sabotage, mapmaking and map reading, photography, forgery, and disguise to revolutionary elements; and, to maintain close surveillance of United States personnel and operations at the US-controlled Guantanamo Bay Naval Base
Areas of involvement: Cuba, USA, and Third World nations in Latin America and Africa, especially in Angola, Central America, and the Caribbean Sea
Allies: KGB
Additional data: The DGI is under direct control of the Soviet Union in matters of assignments, missions, and training.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, Assassination
Alignment profile: 20-94/07-00/20-94

MELT and SAVAK

One (fictitious) TOP SECRET game organization not included in the article in DRAGON issue 93 was MELT, described below.

Middle Eastern Liberation Tribunal (MELT)

Nature of agency: Terrorist group
Governing body: Unknown individuals
Personnel: 50-100
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: Jidda, Saudi Arabia
Established: 1983
Activities: The skyjacking of aircraft and the sabotage of Western space vehicles and launch facilities
Policies: MELT terrorists, who consider themselves idealists, believe that money spent on space exploration should be spent on bringing food to the world’s starving masses instead.
Objectives: To destroy Space Shuttle launch facilities and spacecraft
Areas of involvement: France, Mauritania, and the USA (Florida)
Allies: KGB
Additional data: MELT will assist the Soviets on missions they believe will advance their own objectives.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-94/01-06/82-00

Another agency that should be noted is SAVAK, the (presumed to be) extinct Iranian secret police agency which held power under the Shah of Iran before his over-throw. However, it is conceivable that SAVAK, or a portion of it, survived the 1979 revolution, and that it continues to serve the government of the Ayatollah Khomeini as it once served the Shah. The TOP SECRET game world assumes that this is so, and that SAVAK (or its immediate descendant) continues to exist.

National Intelligence and Security Organization of Iran (SAVAK)

Nature of agency: Iranian secret police force
Governing body: The government of Iran
Personnel: 40,000
Annual budget: $850 million.
HQ: Teheran, Iran.
Established: 1939 (under the Shah; current form began 1979).
Activities: Internal security and foreign counterintelligence.
Policies: SAVAK was formerly known for its use of extreme violence and torture. The current version of the Iranian secret police is scarcely less dangerous, being further motivated by religious intolerance and extreme paranoia.
Objectives: To maintain control of the Iranian republic through the government of the Ayatollah Khomeini.
Areas of involvement: Mostly inside Iran, though agents have been known to exist in the USSR, Afghanistan, Israel and its neighboring states, and (especially) in Iraq.
Allies: The intelligence services of most Arab nations.
Additional data: The war with Iraq, the conflict in Afghanistan, the existence of Israel, the threat of Soviet invasion, the hatred of Americans, and boiling internal difficulties (including assassinations and terrorist attacks on Iranian government officials) have preoccupied SAVAK’s Activities. The name SAVAK is an acronym of Persian words. It is without doubt the most dreaded secret police force in the Moslem Middle East.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/07-00/20-81

The rest of the world

Western intelligence agencies share roughly similar security classifications. The different levels of such classifications are shown in the table below. Increasing levels of secrecy progress from left to right.

Two notes should be made concerning the “Authentic Agencies Part Two” article in DRAGON issue 98. One addition to the description of the BfV is that any one of the state or local Offices for the Protection of the Constitution is called the Landesamt fur Verfassungsschutz (LfV). Also, a third South African agency exists: the South African Defense Force (SADF), which is composed of the Army, Air Force, and Navy of that country. SADF is responsible for external intelligence-gathering and espionage. SADF’s alignment profile is 20-94/20-94/20-81.

The spy agencies of the rest of the world are of much lesser power and influence than those already described, but are worthy of mention. South Korea has a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) which shares intelligence with the USA, Japan, and Taiwan. South Korea’s failure to become a fully democratic society has strained its relationship with the USA, limiting the political intelligence that that country will share with Americans. The USA and South Korea have a “Combined Military Command” and generally share all military intelligence relating to South Korea’s security.

The Taiwanese intelligence agency shares information with Japan, South Korea, Israel, and South Africa. Their agency’s major espionage target is, of course, Communist China, but certain agents have also been sent to the USA to assassinate Taiwanese-Americans who speak out against the Taiwanese government. This agency’s alignment profile is 01-19/07-94/01-81.

Not much is known about the Italian intelligence agencies. Their Office of Intelligence Coordination (abbreviated SID in Italian) was in an uproar recently following the arrest of high-level individuals who attempted to set up a right-wing state-within-a-state. The SID did assist in the rescue of Brigadier General James L. Dozier from Red Brigade terrorists, and it successfully detected a Soviet nuclear submarine and notified the Italian Navy, which chased it from Italian into international waters. The investigation into the Papal assassination attempt also involved Italian intelligence units. SID, the Italian counter-intelligence service, has an Alignment Profile of 01-19/07-94/07-81.

Small West European nations rely on their diplomats, military attaches, and NATO membership for necessary intelligence. Neutral Switzerland relies on its excellent military intelligence services for military, political, and economic intelligence (plus counterespionage). Swiss military intelligence has an alignment profile of 20-94/20-94/20-81. Romania, exercising some freedom from the demands of the KGB, maintains relationships with Albania and Yugoslavia. Romanian intelligence has an alignment profile of 20-94/20-00/20-00. Yugoslavian intelligence has an alignment profile of 20-94/20-94/07-94. The remainder of the Warsaw Pact services give all their intelligence to the KGB or GRU and get little in return.

In the Far East, Mongolia is completely under Soviet control. North Korea, playing Russia against the Chinese, maintains intelligence relations with Iran and Libya through arms sales and training programs. Vietnam, dependent on Russia by choice, provides the Soviets with electronic intelligence facilities at Da Nang and landing rights for Soviet naval intelligence aircraft. These arrangements may change if Vietnam stops pursuing its conquest of Indochina and begins associating with ASEAN.

Non-aligned, emerging, Third World nations use the United Nations as a trading ground of information about neighbors in their region of the world. Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan have developed such an intelligence-sharing relationship. ASEAN began as an economic alliance and now shares many military and political secrets. The intelligence services of the Arab nations currently operate on a national basis; if they pooled their military intelligence, they would pose a serious threat to Israel.

In Africa, Libya supplies Soviet arms to whomever needs them, especially terrorists. Egypt and South Africa have the continent’s most advanced intelligence agencies. Egypt, because of its peace treaty with Israel, is not well liked by other Arab nations and suffers internal strife. South Africa could share much intelligence with British and American sources if it would give up its apartheid practices; instead, it shares intelligence with other politically outcast nations such as Israel and Taiwan. Much of the rest of Africa lies starving and in chaos because of mismanagement by selfish leaders and meddling superpowers.

Just because a nation isn’t as rich or as powerful as some of those described in the last few articles doesn’t mean it can’t have a spy agency of its own. As an example of the complexity of even a small intelligence system, such as those found in Central America, South America, and Africa, the Liberian system is explained below.

Liberia, unique for never having been a colony of a superpower, is surrounded by militarily stronger enemies. Sierra Leone is being assisted by the Cubans and Guinea by the Soviets. The Ivory Coast blames Liberia for the disappearance of their president’s son-in-law during the 1980 coup that carried Samuel K. Doe to power. In 1983, a coup attempt was made to replace Doe with General Quiompka. The unsuccessful coup adds to the country’s internal problems.

This year, President Doe is to allow free elections in Liberia. He hopes to be re-elected.

An intelligence training team from the USA assisted in the development of a functional intelligence organization for the armed forces of Liberia. The Liberian intelligence community is divided into three parts: the National Security Agency (NSA), G2, and Brigade S2.

The NSA, mainly composed of personnel from the President’s tribe, is supposed to be an external intelligence gathering organization but is instead used for gathering internal intelligence. The NSA provides personal presidential security and spies on individuals within the presidential hierarchy. Some NSA agents have dual roles as G2 personnel. The NSA and G2 receive more finances and better equipment than does Brigade S2.

G2, also largely composed of personnel from the president’s tribe, is divided into two sections: administrations and operations. Operations is subdivided into four branches: interrogation, agent, order of battle, and liaison. G2 is primarily responsible for uncovering internal plots and assisting in criminal cases. G2 personnel have judicial jurisdiction over the Liberian people. The interrogators are involved in civil, criminal, military, and espionage matters.

Brigade S2, composed of personnel from a mixture of tribes, is used for gathering external intelligence and combat tactical intelligence. Its duties include reporting on external aggression (which is unlikely) and patrolling the borders. Brigade S2 receives the least amount of finances and resources.

The president uses infiltration on all levels of each intelligence agency to ensure that no one in any agency is building a power base which could overthrow him. The NSA and G2, concerned with internal security, are trying to bring General Quiompka, currently in the Ivory Coast, to justice.

Currently, no cross-indexed files are being kept, much less shared, between the various agencies. There is also no classification system to designate the sensitivity of certain information. Tribal affiliation alone gives an individual a “need to know”, which hardly limits access.

Authentic Agencies Part 2

Written by Merle Rasmussen

This is the second in a series of articles presenting the TOP SECRET game world’s intelligence community. Last month, the American spy agencies were detailed. This month’s edition includes data on allied foreign intelligence-gathering agencies and important international organizations. Note that, though these agencies exist in the real world, they are given here only as constructs for the TOP SECRET game world. Some of the statistics given for these agencies are reasonably accurate and are taken from publicly available information, but some of the statistics were invented for the sake of completeness or were altered to conform to the specific background and nature of the TOP SECRET game world.

Information about these agencies, as with the previous articles in DRAGON issues 93 and 97, is presented in several categories defined below. It is assumed that this information is commonly available to player character agents and to the general public. Agents might be given additional information that isn’t public knowledge during the course of a game campaign.

Nature of agency: The basic nature of the organization.
Governing body: The governing body of most intelligence organizations are national governments. The control for government agencies is the government official to whom the chief of the agency reports. Non- government organizations may have a short description of their group listed here.
Personnel: The estimated size of agency staffs based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
Annual budget: The US dollar figures shown are estimates based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
HQ: The main headquarters for agency operations.
Established: The date the agency was founded.
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence means that the agency is responsible for counterespionage inside the borders of its own country. Foreign counterintelligence means that the agency has responsible for counterespionage outside the borders of its own country.
Policies: Several of the major laws and philosophies of the organization.
Objectives: The major goals of the organization.
Areas of involvement: The places in which the agency is known to operate or exercise jurisdiction.
Allies: Agencies often share intelligence data formally and informally with one another, when it suits them to do so. Associated agencies do not necessarily share intelligence because of publicly recognized treaties.
Additional data: More information on agency structure, operations, covers, and past history is given here.
Bureaus: If the word “All” is present in this category, the following TOP SECRET bureaus may be active within a particular agency: Administration, Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination (see DRAGON issue 82, “New avenues for agents” for an explanation of the newest bureaus). The DIA serves as the Administration Bureau for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps Intelligence. The KGB is the Administration Bureau for the intelligence agencies of the Warsaw Pact nations.
Alignment profile: An agent trained by a particular intelligence agency will very often develop political opinions that are shared by a majority of fellow agents in the organization. The range of personal opinions an agent has relating to political systems, political change, and economic systems are called his alignment profile. The TOP SECRET alignment system was detailed in DRAGON issue 93, in “Agencies and Alignments”.

Security Service (MI5)

Nature of agency: Security service of the United Kingdom
Governing body: Home Office, United Kingdom
Personnel: 2,800
Annual budget: $21 million
HQ: 21 Queen Anne’s Gate, London, England
Established: 1909
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence, including internal security and counter-espionage
Policies: Publication of staff size is not permitted. Britain controls wiretapping by requiring warrants from the Home Secretary or Foreign Secretary, depending upon whether British citizens or foreign diplomats are involved.
Objectives: To identify spies, keep records of their Activities, and decide when such spies should be exposed or arrested
Areas of involvement: Inside the UK
Allies: MI6 and FBI
Additional data: An organization analogous to the FBI, MI5 has no power to make arrests. Arrests are made by the Special Branch, a department of Scotland Yard. Special Branch also presents evidence in security cases, allowing MI5 agents to remain anonymous. MI5 conducts thorough background investigations of its prospective agents.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/20-94

Secret (Intelligence) Service (M16, SIS)

Nature of agency: “Grandfather” of most of the principal intelligence services outside of the Communist world
Governing body: Foreign Office, United Kingdom
Personnel: 2,500
Annual budget: $29.6 million
HQ: Leconfield House, Curzon St, Mayfair, London, England
Established: 1911
Activities: Military intelligence, strategic intelligence, foreign counterintelligence
Policies: Publication of staff size is not permitted
Objectives: To spy on enemies and potential enemies of the nation
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: MI5 and CIA
Additional data: This agency is known to foreigners as the British Secret Service. Captain Mansfield Cumming set up MI6 prior to World War I, and he used his initial “C” to identify himself to his subordinates. The heads of MI6 have called themselves “C” (not “M”) ever since.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/20-94

Defense Intelligence Service

Nature of agency: Military intelligence staff of the three armed services
Governing body: Ministry of Defense, United Kingdom
Personnel: 3,000
Annual budget: $190 million
HQ: Bolton, UK
Established: 1965
Activities: Military intelligence. The Defense Intelligence Service consolidates armed service units.
Policies: To combine intelligence at the ministerial level under a Director of Military Intelligence, whose staff also produce economic, scientific, and technical intelligence
Objectives: To collect and disseminate operational (tactical) intelligence
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, especially in Commonwealth member nations and previous colonies
Allies: NATO
Additional data: The Defense Intelligence Staff replaced the Joint Intelligence Bureau under the permanent undersecretary of the Foreign Office, which is under the Prime Minister.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/20-94

Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ)

Nature of agency: Britain’s primary source of raw information for intelligence analysis
Governing body: Foreign Office, United Kingdom
Personnel: 6,000 to 10,000
Annual budget: $500 million
HQ: Cheltenham, UK
Established: 1954
Activities: Electronic intercept
Policies: To exchange information with allied nations
Objectives: To make and break all codes
Areas of involvement: Analysis of signals intercepted in Eastern Europe, the European part of the Soviet Union, the Middle East, Hong Kong, and Africa
Allies: NSA, Australia’s Defense Signals Division, Canada’s Communication Branch of the National Research Council
Additional data: The GCHQ has liaison officers stationed at NSA’s headquarters in Fort Meade, Md., and in Ottawa and Melbourne. The computers at GCHQ are tied to computers at NSA by a secret cable system. There are four divisions within the Directorate of Sigint Operations and Requirements. Division “J” is classified as “Special Sigint” and deals exclusively with the Soviet bloc. Division “K” handles all other geographical areas with considerable specialization. Division “H” deciphers codes. Division “Z” obtains orders for intelligence from NATO members and assigns monitoring stations and translators to listening tasks.
Bureaus: Administration, Technical, and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/20-94

Direction Générale de la Sécurité Exterieure (DGSE)

Nature of agency: Principal intelligence agency of France
Governing body: Prime Minister, France
Personnel: 2,650
Annual budget: $111 million
HQ: Paris, France
Established: 1981 (The SDECE was established in 1958.)
Activities: Military intelligence, strategic intelligence, electronic intercept, foreign counterintelligence
Policies: The DGSE is divided into three parts: espionage, counterespionage, and covert operations
Objectives: To understand Soviet military strength, and to cope with the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, world energy, and world grain production
Areas of involvement: Former French colonies and worldwide
Allies: DST
Additional data: Nicknamed “The Pool”, this agency was formerly the Service de Documentation Extérieure et de Contre-espionage (SDECE) — the Department of Foreign Information and Counterespionage. The action directorate of DGSE has paratroopers of the 11th Airborne Division assigned to it. The DGSE is one of the most successful agencies in fending off attempts to infiltrate its ranks. The French people do not discuss the DGSE publicly in the same manner that Americans discuss the activities of the CIA.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-94

Deuxième Bureau (Second Bureau)

Nature of agency: French military intelligence agency
Governing body: Minister of Defense, France
Personnel: 5,000
Annual budget: $200 million
HQ: Nice, France
Established: 1872
Activities: Interpreting military intelligence reports
Policies: The Second Bureau is responsible for interpreting intelligence reports; it then delivers the interpretations to the French general staff for use in making strategic and tactical decisions.
Objectives: The same as the DGSE’s objectives
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, especially former French colonies
Allies: The espionage and counterintelligence services of the Special Services (called the Fifth Bureau in wartime)
Additional data: The Second Bureau is currently quite involved in monitoring “minor wars” and terrorist activities in Africa.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Direction de la Sécurité du Territoire (DST, Directorate for Surveillance of the Territory)

Nature of agency: Controlling service of French national surveillance
Governing body: Minister of the Interior, France
Personnel: 3,000
Annual budget: $22 million
HQ: Lyon, France
Established: 1958
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence
Policies: To expel foreign officials caught spying in France
Objectives: To maintain and preserve internal security
Areas of involvement: Inside France
Allies: The DGSE and the Surete (the French police system)
Additional data: Equivalent to MI5 or the FBI in nature
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/01-19

Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND, Federal Intelligence Service)

Nature of agency: Most truly centralized intelligence service of any NATO nation
Governing body: Chancellor, West Germany
Personnel: 6,000
Annual budget: $90 million
HQ: Pullach (near Munich), West Germany
Established: 1956
Activities: Military intelligence, strategic intelligence, electronic intercept, foreign counterintelligence, economic intelligence, political intelligence
Policies: The assessment of intelligence gathered is left entirely to political leadership.
Objectives: To gather order-of-battle information, using members of the military detailed to the BND for that purpose; to gather strategic electronic intelligence; and to interrogate prisoners in time of war
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, especially East Germany
Allies: MAD and Bfv (see below)
Additional data: BND has three divisions subversion, counterintelligence, and foreign intelligence
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Militarischer Abschirmdienst (MAD, Military Intelligence Service)

Nature of agency: Military counterintelligence for West Germany
Governing body: Minister of Defense, West Germany
Personnel: 4,000
Annual budget: $100 million
HQ: Bonn, West Germany
Established: 1956
Activities: Military intelligence, electronic intercept
Policies: Prisoner interrogation in wartime is turned over to the BND; otherwise, interrogation is performed by MAD.
Objectives: To gain tactical intelligence from direct contact with the enemy
Areas of involvement: East and West Germany
Allies: BND and NATO
Additional data: Attempts are being made to avoid the World War II mistakes caused by rivalry between competing government bureaucracies.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz (Bfv, Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution)

Nature of agency: West German counter-intelligence agency
Governing body: Minister of the Interior, West Germany
Personnel: HQ has over 2,000
Annual budget: $87.5 million
HQ: Cologne, West Germany
Established: 1958
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence
Policies: To function as a decentralized system in which the German states retain significant responsibility for internal security. (This is done to avoid the hard-learned lessons of the 1930s and 1940s under the highly centralized Gestapo.)
Objectives: To maintain internal security
Areas of involvement: West Germany
Allies: BND
Additional data: Bfv has five divisions, dealing with administrative and legal matters, right-wing extremism, communist political activities, counterespionage, and security matters.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-81/07-81

Office of Intelligence and Special Missions (Mossad)

Nature of agency: Main department of Israeli intelligence
Governing body: Prime Minister, Israel
Personnel: 1,500 to 2,000
Annual budget: $85 million
HQ: Jerusalem, Israel
Established: 1951 (In 1937, a secret army was started which was later expanded to include espionage and procurement of arms.)
Activities: Strategic intelligence, foreign counterintelligence
Policies: Israeli intelligence gathering and counterintelligence operations are sometimes quite forceful.
Objectives: To collect foreign political, economic, scientific, and technological information. Secret agents of the Special Operations department have also conducted a fierce undercover campaign against enemies of Israel and fugitives who have committed crimes against the Jewish people, particularly war criminals from Nazi Germany who may be at large.
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: The intelligence services of the USA, France, Turkey, Ghana, Japan, Iran, Spain, Portugal, Austria, South Africa, Singapore, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, South Korea, Kenya, Zaire, Liberia, and Christians in Lebanon.
Additional data: This agency is also known as the Central Institution for Intelligence and Special Services (mossad means “institution” in Hebrew). The Mossad often deals directly with other nations, especially those with which Israel has no diplomatic relations. The Mossad is ranked by espionage experts as being among the six best intelligence organizations in the world.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/07-81/20-81

Israeli Military Intelligence (Aman)

Nature of agency: A branch of the Israeli Defense Forces
Governing body: Chief of Staff, Defense Forces, Israel
Personnel: 7,000
Annual budget: $375 million
HQ: Tel Aviv, Israel
Established: 1952-53 (reorganized)
Activities: Military intelligence, strategic intelligence, electronic intercept
Policies: To break all Arab spy rings encircling Israel
Objectives: To collect and analyze material dealing with Arab military and political developments
Areas of involvement: The Middle East
Allies: Aman shares, the same allies as the Mossad.
Additional data: Aman is a subdivision of the Mossad.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/20-94/20-81

Sherut Bitachon Kali (Shin Beth, SHABAK)

Nature of agency: Israeli internal security service
Governing body: Prime Minister, Israel
Personnel: 1,000
Annual budget: $75 million
HQ: Jaffa, Israel
Established: 1951 (with roots back to 1948)
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence and some military intelligence
Policies: Immigrants coming to Israel are monitored by the anti-terrorist section of Shin Beth.
Objectives: To maintain the internal security of Israel
Areas of involvement: Within Israel
Allies: The intelligence services of the USA, France, Turkey, Ghana, Japan, Iran, Spain, Portugal, Austria, South Africa, Singapore, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, South Korea, Kenya, Zaire, Liberia, and the Christians in Lebanon.
Additional data: All telephone communication in Israel can be monitored from a switchboard in Shin Beth headquarters. Shin Beth is analogous to the FBI and MI5. It has three sections: Arab, Eastern European, and Anti-Terrorist.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/20-81/20-81

Koan Choa Cho (Public Security Investigation Agency, PSIA)

Nature of agency: Japanese secret service
Governing body: Prime Minister of Japan
Personnel: 2,600
Annual budget: $76.4 million
HQ: Tokyo, Honshu, Japan
Established: 1952
Activities: To collect political and economic intelligence.
Policies: To work closely with the Keisatsu Cho (Police Guard Division), which was established to monitor left- and right-wing subversive groups
Objectives: To work with the Police Guard Division in investigating subversive movements wherever and whenever they should appear. Both of these agencies possess the powers of arrest and raiding.
Areas of involvement: Within Japan, although much information is collected from outside the country
Allies: Intelligence services of South Korea, Taiwan, and the USA
Additional data: The Japanese desire knowledge for its own sake, whether for peaceful or wartime purposes
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/01-81

Japanese Military Intelligence

Nature of agency: Offices for specific geographic areas in the civilian bureau of the Defense Agency, in the J-2 (Intelligence) section of the Joint Staff, and in the intelligence sections of the Ground, Air, and Maritime Self-Defense Forces
Governing body: Prime Minister of Japan
Personnel: 100
Annual budget: $10 million
HQ: Yokohama, Honshu, Japan
Established: 1954
Activities: Military intelligence, electronic intercept
Policies: The Japanese have no laws for securing classified documents, limiting US/Japanese intelligence exchanges.
Objectives: To accurately keep track of Soviet air and naval operations in the vicinity of Japan, and of Soviet and Chinese ground forces on the Sino-Soviet border
Areas of involvement: Japanese territory, airspace, and surrounding waters
Allies: The CIA assists with mutual security in Japan only.
Additional data: The Japanese military intelligence system consists of a small group of highly trained and multilingual intelligence officers within several military and civilian organizations. The Japanese are experts at electronic intercept.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Australian Security Intelligence Organization (ASIO)

Nature of agency: Australian internal security system
Governing body: Prime Minister of Australia
Personnel: 2,200
Annual budget: $51.5 million
HQ: City of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Established: 1957
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence
Policies: To monitor the activities of civilians or domestic organizations that seek to prejudice internal security
Objectives: To keep subversive elements from undermining the government
Areas of involvement: Within Australia
Allies: Intelligence services of the British Commonwealth and the USA
Additional data: Australia, at present, is not particularly threatened by any major internal problems.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Office of National Assessments (ONA)

Nature of agency: Principal Australian intelligence service
Governing body: Cabinet and Prime Minister of Australia
Personnel: 2,850.
Annual budget: $76.5 million
HQ: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Established: 1977
Activities: Foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To avoid comment or advice regarding government policy, not to use clandestine means to gather information, to avoid duplicating Activities of other departments, and to accept control and overseeing by a committee of ministers on intelligence and security
Objectives: ONA is responsible for national intelligence assessments and current intelligence reporting.
Areas of involvement: Worldwide, but especially in the South Pacific and South-east Asia
Allies: Intelligence services of the British Commonwealth and the USA
Additional data: Responsibility for national intelligence assessment was shifted from the military to the separate civilian agency after World War II.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — Security Systems (RCMP-SS)

Nature of agency: Administrative department
Governing body: Prime Minister of Canada
Personnel: 1,600
Annual budget: $50 million
HQ: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Established: 1873 (present title adopted in 1920)
Activities: Internal security and counter-espionage duties were transferred to SIS in 1981.
Policies: To use any technical equipment handy, from dog sleds to computers
Objectives: To enforce provincial laws and the criminal code. The mounties “always get their man”.
Areas of involvement: Within Canada
Allies: Intelligence services of the British Commonwealth and the USA
Additional data: The RCMP is one of the world’s most notable crime-fighting organizations. It has laboratories for scientific analysis of evidence, large fingerprinting and identification files, and an academy for training police officers. A commissioner runs the organization from Ottawa and has liaison officers in London and Washington, DC The RCMP is the only police force operating in the Yukon Territory and Northwest Territories.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Security Intelligence Service (SIS)

Nature of agency: Canadian internal security service
Governing body: Prime Minister of Canada
Personnel: 1,000
Annual budget: $21 million
HQ: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Established: 1981
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence
Policies: The SIS works within the law in order not to violate any civil liberties. If necessary, laws are changed so that the agency can work effectively within the law.
Objectives: To maintain the internal security of Canada
Areas of involvement: Within Canada
Allies: Intelligence services of the British Commonwealth and the USA
Additional data: This new civilian agency was formed with staff from the RCMP-SS, but it works independently from the RCMP and other police agencies.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Department of National Security (DONS)

Nature of agency: Semi-secret government agency
Governing body: Prime Minister of Republic of South Africa
Personnel: 1,700
Annual budget: $56 million
HQ: Capetown, South Africa
Established: 1978
Activities: Responsible for enforcing rules and laws. Anyone doing anything that could endanger society can be investigated.
Policies: DONS has the power to arrest and detain without warrants of any kind. Members of DONS do not plan murders; they seek to intimidate potential troublemakers, hence the organization’s reputation for violence in the extreme.
Objectives: To maintain the government’s apartheid (racial separation) policies
Areas of involvement: Within the Republic, the Homelands, the Independent Homeland States, and outside the country.
Allies: CID and the intelligence services of Israel and Taiwan.
Additional data: DONS maintains a strongly guarded prison for political dissidents on Robbin Island, in Table Bay near Capetown. DONS was created from an older service, BOSS (Bureau of State Security), which was established in 1969, but is not appreciably different from BOSS.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 07-94/07-00/20-81

Civil Intelligence Department (CID)

Nature of agency: Secret investigative department
Governing body: Prime Minister of Republic of South Africa
Personnel: 1,600
Annual budget: $54.5 million
HQ: Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa
Established: 1974
Activities: Foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To investigate plots to overthrow or control the government of South Africa
Objectives: To prevent sabotage and the loss of national secrets
Areas of involvement: Outside the Republic of South Africa
Allies: DONS
Additional data: The CID is analogous to a secret FBI.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 07-94/07-94/20-81

International Reporting and Information Service (IRIS)

Nature of agency: Privately owned international business
Governing body: Large European financial institutions, organized by a US publisher and a former British Prime Minister
Personnel: 96 correspondents, 33 analysists, plus a varying number of others
Annual budget: $15 million
HQ: New York City, New York, USA
Established: 1982
Activities: IRIS stores business data which can be retrieved by analysists studying specific trends in the international business community. Meaningful data for a client is sifted from the mass of information that becomes available daily.
Policies: To make all information obtained by this worldwide computerized organization available to the public for a price
Objectives: To serve as an intermediary organization between busy executives in the commercial world and the flood of information around them
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: None
Additional data: IRIS is comparable to, but excels, the CIA in computer capacity.
Bureaus: Administration, Investigation, Technical, Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/01-81

International organizations

United Nations Security Council

Nature of agency: Primary instrument for establishing and maintaining international peace
Governing body: Five permanent member nations (USA, USSR, United Kingdom, France, and the People’s Republic of China) and 10 temporary member nations.
Personnel: Varies
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: United Nations Building, New York City, New York, USA
Established: 1945
Activities: The Security Council may dispatch an armed UN force to stop aggression.
Policies: To prevent war by settling disputes between nations
Objectives: To establish and maintain international peace
Areas of involvement: The planet Earth, the Moon, and the space between them.
Allies: UN member nations
Additional data: Dispatched forces may be from any member nation. All member nations undertake to make available armed forces, assistance, and facilities to maintain international peace and security.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 20-81/20-81/20-81

Australia, New Zealand, and United States Alliance (ANZUS)

Nature of agency: Regional defensive alliance
Governing body: Member nations
Personnel: Varies
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: None
Established: 1952
Activities: Military alliance
Policies: Each member nation may choose not to share documents with its allies.
Objectives: To take any necessary joint counteraction under UN charter, including the use of armed force
Areas of involvement: Indian Ocean Arabian Sea, and Persian Gulf
Allies: Australia, New Zealand, and USA
Additional data: New Zealand recently forbade US ships which were probably carrying nuclear weapons from docking at New Zealand’s ports, an action which has called the existence of ANZUS into question.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)

Nature of agency: Non-military economic alliance
Governing body: Member nations
Personnel: Varies
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: Bangkok, Thailand
Established: 1967
Activities: ASEAN members regularly exchange political, economic, and military intelligence with each other.
Policies: To cooperate on international, political, and economic issues
Objectives: To promote regional economic integration, like the European Economic Community
Areas of involvement: Southeast Asia
Allies: Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore are members, with Papua New Guinea having observer status
Additional data: ASEAN was organized at first as an economic grouping.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/01-81

Kilowatt

Nature of agency: Anti-terrorist organization
Governing body: Member nations
Personnel: None of its own
Annual budget: None of its own
HQ: None
Established: 1978
Activities: Organization concerned with Arab terrorism
Policies: National units are trained in the commando techniques of West Germany’s Leatherheads (GSG9), Britain’s legendary SAS, and the French Gendarmerie’s Intervention Group (GIGN).
Objectives: To communicate with member nations in an effort to reduce and control terrorist activities
Areas of involvement: Within member nations
Allies: West Germany, Belgium, Italy, the United Kingdom, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, France, Canada, Ireland, Sweden, Norway, and Israel
Additional data: This counter terrorist organization was established to trade information and to act as a center for information on terrorist organizations, operatives, methods, and links.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 07-19/07-94/07-81

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

Nature of agency: Regional defensive alliance
Governing body: NATO council of top foreign, economic, defense, and financial ministers
Personnel: Varies
Annual budget: Varies
HQ: Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers, Europe (SHAPE) is located at “Camp Casteau” near the Mons area in Belgium, about 30 miles southwest of Brussels.
Established: 1949
Activities: Military and naval defensive alliance
Policies: Each member nation may chose not to share information produced by its own intelligence services.
Objectives: To take necessary joint counteraction under the UN charter, including the use of armed force
Areas of involvement: Member countries on or near the North Atlantic Ocean.
Allies: Belgium, United Kingdom, Canada, Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, West Germany, and the USA are members.
Additional data: NATO protects an area of 8 million square miles, containing 500 million people.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Authentic Agencies Part 1

Written by Merle Rasmussen

The TOP SECRET game world is very much like our own, with a few subtle (and not-so-subtle) differences. Most of the same nations exist on the map, and most of the same espionage organizations operate across the globe. In DRAGON issue 93, some of the spy organizations unique to the TOP SECRET world were described for use in campaign games. But what of the real agencies, such as the CIA, the KGB, and the British Secret Service?

This article is the first in a short series that presents the rest of the world’s “Top Secret” community, and it will cover the various American intelligence-gathering agencies. It must be noted that though these agencies exist in the real world, they are given here only as constructs for the TOP SECRET game world. Most of the statistics given below for these agencies are reasonably accurate and are taken from publicly available information, but some of the statistics were invented for the sake of completeness, and some may have been altered to conform to the specific background and nature of the TOP SECRET game world.

Information about these agencies, as with the previous article in issue 93, is presented in several categories (defined below).

It is assumed that this information is commonly available to player character agents and to the general public, though the agents might be given additional information that is not public knowledge during the course of a game campaign.

Nature of agency: The basic nature of the organization.
Governing body: The governing body of most intelligence organizations are national governments. The control for government agencies is the government official to whom the chief of the agency reports. Non-government organizations may have a short description of their group listed here.
Personnel: The estimated size of agency staffs based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
Annual budget: The US dollar figures shown are estimates based on public sources. Comparisons show the relative size and activity of various agencies.
HQ: The main headquarters for agency operations.
Established: The date the agency was founded.
Activities: Domestic counterintelligence means that the agency is responsible for counterespionage inside the borders of its own country. Foreign counterintelligence means that the agency has responsible for counterespionage outside the borders of its own country.
Policies: Several of the major laws and philosophies of the organization.
Objectives: The major goals of the organization.
Areas of involvement: The places in which the agency is known to operate or exercise jurisdiction.
Allies: Agencies often share intelligence data formally and informally with one another, when it suits them to do so. Associated agencies do not necessarily share intelligence because of publicly recognized treaties.
Additional data: More information on agency structure, operations, covers, and past history is given here.
Bureaus: If the word “All” is present in this category, the following TOP SECRET bureaus may be active within a particular agency: Administration, Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination (see DRAGON issue 82, “New avenues for agents” for an explanation of the newest bureaus). The DIA serves as the Administration Bureau for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps Intelligence. The KGB is the Administration Bureau for the intelligence agencies of the Warsaw Pact nations.
Alignment profile: An agent trained by a particular intelligence agency will very often develop political opinions that are shared by a majority of fellow agents in the organization. The range of personal opinions an agent has relating to political systems, political change, and economic systems are called his alignment profile. The TOP SECRET alignment system was detailed in DRAGON issue 93, in “Agencies and Alignments”.

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

Nature of agency: US government executive agency
Governing body: President, USA
Personnel: 15,000-16,500, including 7,500 operatives
Annual budget: $1.5 billion
HQ: Langley, Virginia, USA
Established: 1947
Activities: The CIA coordinates, correlates, evaluates, and disseminates the results of the following types of intelligence: military, strategic, political, economic, biographical, geographical, sociological, scientific, and technical. The CIA is also involved with both domestic and foreign counterintelligence. It also performs certain services for other intelligence agencies.
Policies: To exploit new technology for the clandestine collection of foreign intelligence, for the conduct of foreign counterintelligence, and for researching and developing technical collection systems
Objectives: The first priority of the CIA is understanding Soviet military strength. Other areas of concern are problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, world energy, and world grain production.
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: DIA, NSA, Army Intelligence, Naval Intelligence, Air Force Intelligence, Marine Corp Intelligence, State Department, Energy Department, Treasury Department, FBI, MI6 (British Secret Service) and GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters, United Kingdom)
Additional data: US Special Forces (“Green Berets”) are sometimes used to execute CIA plans. The CIA’s notorious reputation in the world includes the use of assassination-planning squads known as “Health Alteration Committees”.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

National Security Agency (NSA)

Nature of agency: Secret US federal agency
Governing body: Secretary of Defense, Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 95,000 worldwide, including 52,500 at Fort Meade
Annual budget: Over $2 billion
HQ: Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, USA
Established: 1952
Activities: Electronic intercept
Policies: All material is excluded from the Freedom of Information Act. The NSA can intercept all foreign and domestic communication if the domestic is proven to be connected to or associated with a foreign government.
Objectives: To intercept signal intelligence (SIGINT), to perform code breaking, and to create US codes
Areas of involvement: All levels of Soviet cipher systems; Korean, Chinese, and other Communist Asian cipher systems; Latin America and all other cipher systems of the world
Allies: CIA, GCHQ
Additional data: The NSA’s computers cover 10 subterranean acres. Its post office handles 18,000 pieces of mail per day, and its telephone exchange connects 30,000 calls a month. Forty tons of classified material are shredded per day. The computers at NSA are tied to the computers at GCHQ by a secret cable system. The NSA’s nickname is “No Such Agency”.
Bureaus: Administration, Technical, Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA)

Nature of agency: US federal agency
Governing body: Secretary of Defense, Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 7,000
Annual budget: $9 billion including the NSA
HQ: The Pentagon, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1961
Activities: Military and strategic intelligence. The DIA coordinates the intelligence Activities of the military services and manages the Defense Attaché System, which assigns military attaches to US embassies around the world.
Policies: To collect and produce intelligence for the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Objectives: To defend the US against all enemies, and to ensure the security of the US and all areas vital to its interests
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: CIA
Additional data: During wartime, photographs are sent back to the US for processing by the DIA, which makes a more concentrated analysis of the information given in the pictures. The DIA and CIA have an interdepartmental rivalry. As noted above, the DIA serves as the Administration Bureau for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps Intelligence.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM)

Nature of agency: Field command
Governing body: Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 35,000
Annual budget: $700 million
HQ: The Pentagon, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1775
Activities: Military and military-related foreign intelligence, counterintelligence, tactical intelligence
Policies: Command Group INSCOM (CGINSCOM) is responsible for fulfilling national-level intelligence, security, electronic warfare, and related functions within the command’s operational responsibility.
Objectives: To interact with other Army Field Commands on matters related to intelligence and security training, doctrine, research and development, and logistics
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: DIA
Additional data: The CGINSCOM commands Army Intelligence and security units above corps level in the US and overseas. INSCOM performs intelligence and security functions in support of the Department of the Army and other major Army commands, and it can support commanders in the field.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI)

Nature of agency: Office of the Department of the Navy
Governing body: Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 20,000
Annual budget: $600 million
HQ: The Pentagon, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1882
Activities: Military (especially naval) intelligence
Policies: To support naval operations through three supporting commands: Naval Intelligence Command (NAVINTCOM), Naval Security Group (NSG), and Naval Investigative Service (NIS).
Objectives: To provide intelligence via NAVINTCOM and cryptology (less signal security) via NSG. Information security, counterintelligence and counter terrorism, law enforcement, and investigative matters are provided by NIS.
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: DIA
Additional data: It is reported that the Navy has a worldwide maritime spy effort composed of business fronts and recruited nationals as agents in more than 140 locations. It replaces Task Force 157 and is called Task Force 168. The NIS is primarily a civilian-staffed law enforcement organization responsible for providing investigative support in matters involving serious crimes committed by or against Naval personnel; its investigations into fraud and other criminal Activities have saved the Navy millions of dollars in equipment loss or damage. In 1983, the NIS employed 1350 outside personnel, of which 770 were agents. The Navy also has a fully integrated reserve intelligence force of well-trained civilian specialists.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Air Force Intelligence Service (AFIS)

Nature of agency: Special operating agency under HQ USAF
Governing body: Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 56,000
Annual budget: $2.7 billion
HQ: Fort Belvoir, Virginia, USA
Established: 1947
Activities: To perform military intelligence by conducting in-depth all-source research, directing collection Activities, processing and disseminating intelligence information, and exercising management and control of all intelligence systems and special security systems.
Policies: To contribute to the deterrence of potential actions by foreign parties that would conflict with US and allied interests; to increase the probability of success for aerospace power to conclude hostilities on terms favorable to US and allied interests; to improve the effective conduct of other military operations
Objectives: To provide decision-makers with information on current and estimated foreign military Activities, strategy, tactics, capabilities, and intentions; to reduce decision-making risks associated with national security policy and the structuring, posturing, and employment of US military forces
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: DIA
Additional data: Among the US military services, the Air Force has the largest intelligence program. Its Foreign Technology Division is a leading national source of analysis of foreign aircraft and missiles.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

National Reconnaissance Office (NRO)

Nature of agency: Office under the Department of the Air Force
Governing body: Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, USA
Personnel: 4,000 included in AFIS
Annual budget: Over $2 billion included in Air Force operations
HQ: Fort Belvoir, Virginia, USA
Established: 1961
Activities: Military intelligence
Policies: To oversee the development and operation of spy satellites and the operation of secret Space Shuttle missions.
Objectives: To photograph foreign territory, and to monitor international communications
Areas of involvement: Worldwide
Allies: CIA, DIA, NSA, and Air Force Intelligence
Additional data: The NRO handles the routine operation of spy satellites. It is believed that during the late 1960s and early 1970s, US surveillance satellites were turned on American antiwar demonstrations and urban riots in an effort to determine crowd size and Activities involved. Military Space Shuttle launches from Vandenberg AFB, California, USA, are also managed by the NRO.
Bureaus: Technical and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

United States Marine Corps Intelligence

Nature of agency: Office of the USMC
Governing body: Department of Defense, USA
Personnel: 5550
Annual budget: $140 million
HQ: The Pentagon, Washington, DC
Established: 1775
Activities: Primarily amphibious tactical warfare intelligence
Policies: To support commanders at all echelons in the conduct of operations
Objectives: To provide intelligence for the Fleet Marine Forces and their task-oriented Marine Air-Ground Task Forces (MAGTFs) through a triad of organizations: Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), Marine Corps Development and Education Command (MCDEC), and the Fleet Marine Forces
Areas of involvement: Worldwide coastal areas
Allies: DIA, Naval Intelligence
Additional data: HQMC is responsible for counterintelligence, plans and estimates, signals intelligence, electronic warfare, intelligence management (personnel, training, and research and development), and national intelligence Activities. MCDEC provides support in the areas of research, development, education, and training. The Fleet Marine Forces contain the operational intelligence capability that supports MAGTFs.
Bureaus: Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, Operations, and Assassination
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-94/07-81

Bureau of Intelligence and Research of the Department of State (SBI)

Nature of agency: US government
Governing body: Secretary of State, USA
Personnel: 350
Annual budget: $12.5 million
HQ: 15th St. & Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1789
Activities: Strategic, political, and some economic intelligence
Policies: To advise the President in formulating and executing foreign policy
Objectives: To promote US interests in international relations
Areas of involvement: US diplomatic and consular posts abroad
Allies: CIA
Additional data: The SBI coordinates the Department of State’s relations with foreign intelligence operations.
Bureaus: Administration, Investigation, Confiscation, Technical, and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Nature of agency: US federal bureau
Governing body: Attorney General, USA
Personnel: 19,000 employees; 7,800 are Special Agents
Annual budget: $555 million
HQ: J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1908
Activities: Foreign counterintelligence
Policies: To perform duties other than the agency’s objectives specifically imposed by law or Presidential directive, and to conduct service Activities for other law enforcement agencies
Objectives: To investigate violations of certain federal statutes, and to collect evidence in cases in which the US is or may be an interested party
Areas of involvement: Within the USA
Allies: CIA and MI5
Additional data: The FBI has 59 field offices located in major cities throughout the USA and in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The FBI had fingerprint files on 64,680,080 persons as of February 1, 1979. The FBI has an Academy at Quantico, Virginia. The National Institute of Justice, with an annual budget of $1.5 million a year for crime analysis, provides state and local law enforcement agencies with FBI facilities.
Bureaus: All
Alignment profile: 01-19/20-81/07-81

Department of the Treasury

Nature of agency: US government executive department
Governing body: USA
Personnel: 300
Annual budget: $10 million
HQ: 15th & Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, DC, USA
Established: 1789
Activities: Collects foreign financial and monetary intelligence, and assists the Department of State in collecting economic intelligence
Policies: To manage national finances, to provide currency, to maintain US credit, to represent the US in international banking and monetary organizations, to collect taxes, and to supervise the Secret Service
Objectives: (In addition to the above) To protect the President, the Vice-President, the President-Elect, all major Presidential candidates, and the families of all of the above
Allies: CIA, Department of State
Additional data: The Department of the Treasury controls a worldwide narcotics investigation bureau. It also administers the Customs Service; the Internal Revenue Service; the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; the Bureau of the Mint; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center; and the Bureau of the Public Debt.
Bureaus: Administration, Investigation, Technical, and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-94/07-81

Department of Energy (DOE)

Nature of agency: US government executive department
Governing body: United States of America
Personnel: 300
Annual budget: $20 million
HQ: 1000 Independence Ave, Washington, DC, USA
Established: August 1977
Activities: Political, economic, and technical intelligence concerning foreign energy matters
Policies: To promote conservation, resource development and production, research, data management, and environmental protection and regulation related to energy
Objectives: To carry out the national energy policy
Allies: CIA
Additional data: The DOE is primarily a consumer of intelligence but does provide technical and analytical research capabilities to other intelligence operations.
Bureaus: Administration, Investigation, Technical, and Operations
Alignment profile: 01-19/07-81/07-81

Gunnery, New and Updated

Written by Jimmy Anderson and Chris Johnson

The following are the new (and hopefully) improved tables for determining PWV. As we play test these and fine tune them, we will once again post stats for each weapon. 9mm is the basis for PWV as it is most prevalent. Base PWV is 50 and is for a 9mm with a 4″ barrel. Barrel Length: round fractions of an inch to nearest inch. Each inch above 4″ adds +2 to PWV. Each inch under 4″ takes away 2. Guns have several specs. They include:

Range modifiers have been made more uniform. Simply subtract 1 per foot from shooter to target. Low Velocity ammo is available for all except magnums. It causes -10 PWV, 1/2 silencer value, and -2 Damage. Magnum (and magnum rated shells) cause -5 cumulative, +2 Damage, +5 Silencer. Low Velocity modifiers are in addition to the ones listed. Magnum modifiers have been included. The calibers available in commercially available handguns and their specs are included. Omissions will be added as well as new calibers as they become available.
PWV Self explanatory Damage Damage modifier Silencer Cumulative chance that your silencer will fail to silence effectively. The administrator secretly rolls to determine if silencer is still functioning properly. Each time a shot is made, roll d%. If the number (remember, it’s cumulative) or less is rolled, then the next shot would be louder than with a silencer though much quieter than without one. The player would be told *when that next* shot is made that the sound is going bad. The next time d% rolls lower or equal to the cumulative value, the silencer is gone and the next shot would be at full sound level. Cumulative The cumulative effect of shooting this weapon during consecutive phases. The following reloading speeds are assuming the ammo is easily accessible. For example: if character is crouched down and shells are in pants pocket, then 1 phase would be required just to get a handful of shells.

If a magazine in inserted and there is still a shell chambered, the gun is ready to shoot. If not, don’t forget to adjust the speed for the next phase. A phase may be spent at any time to just chamber a round.

Single Action Revolver
Unload Shell 1 Phase
Load Shell 1 Phase
Double Action Revolver
Unload Single Shell 1 Phase
Unload All 1 Phase
Load Single Shell 1 Phase
Load with Speed Loader 2 Phases
Magazine
Load/Unload Shell 1 Phase
Remove Magazine 1 Phase
Put Away Magazine 1 Phase
Insert Magazine 1 Phase
  PWV Damage Silencer Cumulative
BB +30 1/2 Normal -5
.17 Pellet +30 1/2 Normal -5
.22 Rimfire +20 -3 2 -6
.22 Rimfire Magnum +20 -1 7 -11
.25 ACP +15 -3 2 -8
.30 +12 -2 3 -10
.32 ACP +10 -2 3 -10
7.65mm +10 -2 3 -10
.32 Rimfire +10 -2 3 -10
.32 Rimfire Magnum +10 0 8 -10
.38 Special 0 -1 4 -12
.380 ACP 0 -1 4 -12
9mm Makarov 0 0 5 -14
9mm Para 0 0 5 -14
.38 Super 0 +2 10 -19
.357 SIG 0 +2 10 -19
.357 Magnum 0 +2 10 -19
.357 AMP 0 +2 10 -19
.40 S&W -10 +1 6 -19
10mm -10 +1 6 -19
.400 CorBon -10 +1 6 -19
.41 Magnum -15 +3 11 -20
.44 Special -15 +2 7 -17
.44 Russian -15 +2 7 -17
.44 Magnum -15 +4 12 -22
.44 AMP -15 +4 12 -22
.45 ACP -18 +2 8 -22
.45 Colt -18 +2 8 -22
.45 Long Colt -18 +2 8 -22
.45 Super -18 +4 13 -22
.45 Magnum -18 +4 13 -22
.454 Cassull -20 +5 15 -25
.475 Wildey Magnum -25 +5 17 -27
.50 AE -30 +4 15 -25
Single Action Revolver Uncocked -10
Cocked 0
Double Action Revolver Uncocked -5
Cocked 0
Double Action Only Revolver -5
Double Action Only Automatic -5
Unchambered -15
Unchambered with Slide Open -10
Single or Double Action Automatic Uncocked -5
Cocked 0
Unchamered -15
Unchambered with Slide Open -10
Single Action Only Automatic Uncocked -10
Cocked 0
Unchamered -15
Unchambered with Slide Open -10

PWV: Self explanatory
Damage: Damage modifier
Silencer: Cumulative chance that your silencer will fail to silence effectively. The administrator secretly rolls to determine if silencer is still functioning properly. Each time a shot is made, roll d%. If the number (remember, it’s cumulative) or less is rolled, then the next shot would be louder than with a silencer though much quieter than without one. The player would be told *when that next* shot is made that the sound is going bad. The next time d% rolls lower or equal to the cumulative value, the silencer is gone and the next shot would be at full sound level.
Cumulative: The cumulative effect of shooting this weapon during consecutive phases.